MCC brings a set of new rules, Big-sized bats banned and No change in the term ‘batsman’ even in Women cricket

March 8, 2017, 2:01 pm
MCC brings a set of new rules, Big-sized bats banned and No change in the term ‘batsman’ even in Women cricket
CRICKET
CRICKET
MCC brings a set of new rules, Big-sized bats banned and No change in the term ‘batsman’ even in Women cricket

MCC brings a set of new rules, Big-sized bats banned and No change in the term ‘batsman’ even in Women cricket

The big 'batters' of the world cricket now has to slice down the weight of their bats or use a more slim version of it as the Marylbone Cricket Club, who is responsible reviewing existing cricket laws and developing new ones, has found that the large-sized bats are the cause of turning cricket too batsmen-friendly. Interesting!

No, the MCC has announced a batch of other interesting rules.

The panel found that the bat sizes have caused in the making of Cricket a more batsmen friendly game and the bowlers have to bear the brunt of it. According to the new rule,bats will be measured with a “bat gauge” to make sure they don’t exceed 108mm in width, 67mm in depth and 40mm at the edges.

Umpires will also be able to send players from the field – temporarily or permanently – for serious offences like acts of violence in the first new Code of Laws issued since 2000.

Under the new laws, umpires can also crack down on poor behaviour by issuing warnings, awarding penalty runs and even sending players off.

Excessive appealing and showing dissent at an umpire’s decision can result in a warning, followed by five penalty runs for a second offence.

Throwing the ball at a player or deliberately making physical contact will be punished with five penalty runs, while threatening the umpire or any act of violence will result in a sending-off.

The panel has also made it clear that the controversial 'mankading' run-out in no more unethical, in fact, it is legal.

The controversial ‘Mankad’ dismissal, when the bowler can run out a batsman at the non-striker’s end, will also become easier to execute.

Separately, gender-neutral terms like “fielder” and “bowler” will be used in the rewritten Code, as well as “he/she” to encourage women and girls to play.

“The term ‘batsman’ will remain, however, as it is seen as a term of the game that is equally applicable to females,” the statement added.