Bails remain atop the stumps even middle stump was uprooted during a cricket match 

May 9, 2017, 6:17 pm
Bails remain atop the stumps even middle stump was uprooted during a cricket match 
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Bails remain atop the stumps even middle stump was uprooted during a cricket match 

Bails remain atop the stumps even middle stump was uprooted during a cricket match 

In one of the gravity defying moments in Cricket, a middle stump was removed but bails remained in place during a match in Melbourne Australia. It is an Indian-descent batsman Jatinder Singh found himself in a tough situation.

The incident occurred in a winter competition in Melbourne's north-west on Saturday when Singh was clean-bowled during a match against Strathmore Heights.

But in a strange way the two bails remained intact perching atop the other two undisturbed stumps.

After some deliberation, Singh was correctly given out, though the umpires could have been forgiven had they come to the opposite conclusion. Law 28 of the Marylebone Cricket Club's Laws of Cricket dictates, "the disturbance of a bail, whether temporary or not, shall not constitute its complete removal from the top of the stumps", meaning just because the bails had moved, it doesn't necessarily mean it's out. The MCC-produced Tom Smith's Cricket Umpiring and Scoring spells goes into more detail; if both bails remain "on top" of the stumps, or if any part of a displaced bail is above unbroken stumps, the stumps are not deemed to be 'down'.

In this case, both bails were on top of stumps, right? The bails weren't "displaced", and they were both technically above "unbroken stumps", weren't they? Sure, but keen cricket followers would of course know the first part of Law 28 also states that a wicket is considered down if a stump is "struck out of the ground".