Singur movement to be part of school syllabus in West Bengal

February 13, 2017, 6:59 pm
Singur movement to be part of school syllabus in West Bengal
EDUCATION
EDUCATION
Singur movement to be part of school syllabus in West Bengal

Singur movement to be part of school syllabus in West Bengal

The iconic Singur moment against land acquisition for Tata Nao project, which paved the way among other things to the down fall of three decades of left rule in West Bengal will be introduced in the history syllabus of state-run schools from this year.

West Bengal education minister Partha Chatterjee, who described the Singur movement as a “historic win” for the farmers, on Monday told a question-answer session in the Assembly that a chapter detailing the agitation would be included in the history syllabus of class eight.

Though the so called grand alliance against the Singur plant did not have a homogeneous nature, Opposition Trinamool Congress led by current chief minister Mamata Banerjee has no doubt played the leaders role.

Later, speaking to reporters, Minister said, “It’s a historic win for the farmers. Along with the Singur movement, the Tebhaga movement and Krishak Andolan will also feature in the syllabus and students must know that this movement is one of the milestones in the country’s history.”

Chatterjee said that distribution of the books had already been started. After the Supreme Court verdict allowing redistribution of Singur land among farmers, the state education department had sent the proposal to the syllabus committee for approval of the inclusion of Singur movement in the Madhyamik school syllabus.

In 2006, after the Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee government announced that about 1,000 acre of land in Singur — located in one of the most fertile tracts of the state — will be acquired for setting up the Nano plant of Tata Motors. Protests in Singur against a proposed factory made headlines across the globe and catapulted then opposition leader Mamata Banerjee to limelight. By 2007, Singur — along with Nandigram — had become a symbol for popular mass protests against forcible land acquisition and paved the way for a farmer-friendly law in 2013.

The demonstrations carried Banerjee — who sat on a hunger strike against the Tata factory — to power in 2011, dislodging a 34-year-old Left Front government. She also vowed to give the land back to the farmers.

The minister also said that by 15 March, the government would complete the entire process of employing 72,000 teachers in primary, upper-primary, Madhyamik and Higher Secondary schools.

He requested ‘opponents’ not to move court creating hurdles in the process of employment of teachers and said that his department was going through a verification process at present.