IIT Kharagpur to teach Vastu Shastra to mould ‘well-rounded architects’

April 17, 2017, 1:30 pm
IIT Kharagpur to teach Vastu Shastra to mould  ‘well-rounded architects’
EDUCATION
EDUCATION
IIT Kharagpur to teach Vastu Shastra to mould  ‘well-rounded architects’

IIT Kharagpur to teach Vastu Shastra to mould ‘well-rounded architects’

Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur will soon introduce ‘Vastu Shastra’ as a part of its syllabus as the country’s oldest IIT believes one cannot be a “well-rounded architect” unless you have learnt the basics of Vastu.

According to reports, the institute recently conducted a workshop on the subject and plans to include an introductory course for first and second year undergraduate architecture students, and a more exhaustive course for post-graduate and research students from August this year.

The faculty believes Vastu concepts are not religious and are instead based on science and there is no reason why Indian architecture students shouldn’t know the “ancient Indian architectural traditions.”

“Times are changing and across the globe there is a renewed interest in ancient Indian knowledge. So, it is natural that we will tweak our syllabus to include Vastu in architecture and infrastructure classes,” a faculty member of the architecture department Joy Sen was quoted by the Times of India.

Incorporating Vastu principles in designs of buildings could make buildings more eco-friendly since principles of layout, measurements, ground preparation, space arrangement and spatial geometry are well defined in Vaastu Shastra
Joy Sen, IIT Kharagpur faculty

Undergraduate students will be studying basic design and history of architecture in Vastu Shastra, while at the post-graduate level, concepts of social principles, nine-circuit placements, sacred altars and design semiotics and semantics will be taught to students. Assignments, projects and tests on Vastu Shastra will also be a part of the curriculum.

“Vastu Shastra has its beginnings in Rig Veda and is scientific in its tenor,” Sen added.

Meanwhile, critics have slammed the move saying it is another instance of saffronising education and will adversely affect the basics of secular pedagogy.