McDonald’s opens up about the rumoured ‘meat’ used in their burgers 

February 5, 2017, 1:32 pm
McDonald’s opens up about the rumoured ‘meat’  used in their burgers 
FOOD AND DRINK
FOOD AND DRINK
McDonald’s opens up about the rumoured ‘meat’  used in their burgers 

McDonald’s opens up about the rumoured ‘meat’ used in their burgers 

There have been rumours looming about the meat being used in the patty of McDonald’s burger. Videos and images of disgusting pars of the animal waste have been passing around on most major social media platforms including Whatsapp. Most of the people think the viral rumour is true, from the pink slimy meat chunk to the processed meat!

After deep thought, the giant, international food chain has decided to put a shut to all rumours revealing what the patty is actually made of, reports Anonymous.

Slamming the critics who questioned the quality of their fast food, McDonald’s has launched a PR campaign called “Our food. Your Questions.” to provide the customers with a peep into what the so called ‘junk food’ is made up of. While the the food chain denies they use “pink slime” in their burgers, people face the company with raised eyebrows and questions to know what are the ingredients being used in the burgers.

McDonald’s admit on using rubber in the food and also claim that rubber use in the food is actually safe, reports Anonymous.

“There are varied uses for azodicarbonamide, including in some non-food products, such as yoga mats. As a result, some people have suggested our food contains rubber or plastic, or that the ingredient is unsafe. It’s simply not the case. Think of salt: the salt you use in your food at home is a variation of the salt you may use to de-ice your sidewalk. The same is true of ADA — it can be used in different ways.”

The company admits to using dimethylpolysiloxane in their food, which is used as an anti-foaming agent in their McNugget frying oil.But, you’ll be surprised, when you find out that their patties are “100% beef”. Their chief brand manager insists that customers should “not judge us before you know us.”