‘This is a serious issue, we will have riots’; SC refuses to stay petitions against note ban

November 18, 2016, 2:45 pm
‘This is a serious issue, we will have riots’; SC refuses to stay petitions against note ban
INDIA
INDIA
‘This is a serious issue, we will have riots’; SC refuses to stay petitions against note ban

‘This is a serious issue, we will have riots’; SC refuses to stay petitions against note ban

The Supreme Court on Friday refused to stay petitions against the demonetisation pending before different lower courts across the country. The apex court expressed serious concern over the state of affairs after the currency ban, observing “We will have riots on the streets,” if the situation persists.

This is second time within a week, the SC tears apart the government’s move banning old high denomination notes, taking note of the public distress.

It indicates the magnitude of the problem is serious. People are going to the High Courts for relief. This is a serious issue. Let them go
Supreme Court bench

“The last time you said you are working out relief but you have reduced the withdrawal amount to 2,000. What's the problem? Is it printing problem?”, a bench of Chief Justice T.S. Thakur and Justice Anil R. Dave as Attorney General Mukul Rohatgi urged the apex court to stay all such proceeding in lower courts.

Meanwhile, Rohatgi said the situation is being monitored at the highest-level everyday, things are getting sorted out and “Queues are getting shorter”.

According to reports, during the hearing, Mukul Rohatgi and senior advocate and Congress leader Kapil Sibal had a verbal spat over problems faced by people due to demonetisation.

The attorney general acused Kapil Sibal of politicising the court proceedings because of his affiliation to political party's stand. Sibal, on his part, said that the government is inept and clueless about handling the situation that has arisen because of ill-planned demonetisation, Times of India reported.

Adjourning the matter for 25 November, the court asked the Attorney General to file a transfer petition appeal if they want a stay.

Meanwhile, the Election Commission wrote to the Finance Ministry asking it to use the indelible ink keeping in view the commission's directions for usage during elections. It also raised the concern as several states are set to go to polls. Indelible ink is primarily used to mark citizens who have already voted.

With inputs from agencies