The feud between the Trade unions of Mollywood and Producers Association lead to a Christmas without movies

December 18, 2016, 11:09 am
The feud between the Trade unions of Mollywood and Producers Association lead to a Christmas without movies
SOUTH MOVIE
SOUTH MOVIE
The feud between the Trade unions of Mollywood and Producers Association lead to a Christmas without movies

The feud between the Trade unions of Mollywood and Producers Association lead to a Christmas without movies

Christmas is one time of the year when a family together can go some merry-making and movies. Mollywood had a list of promising movies that were to hit the theatres for the Christmas of 2016.

When film lovers of the state were enjoying world wide classic cinemas showcased in the Capital city of Thiruvananthapuram, trade unions of Mollywood decided to meet up in the Financial capital of the State, Cochin to decide on the fate of movies that were slated to be released for Christmas.

As a shocker for the flick goers, movies Ezra, Jomonte Suvisheshangal, Fukri and Munthirivallikal Thalirkkumbol will have to remain in shelves till the stand still is cleared.

Producers Association claim that the Kerala Film Exhibitor’s Federation called a halt on the release of the movies for a 50 percent of revenue share.

This means the producer will get just half the revenue. We cannot agree that as it does not benefit the producer, who funds the film facing many risks. That is why the association members unanimously decided to hold the release 
G. Suresh Kumar, President, Kerala Producer’s Association 

He clearly states that the exhibitors of the federation have other means of income other than selling movie tickets.

They get income in the form if canteen rent, parking fee, advertisement films and erection of hoardings inside their compounds. in fact, the producer has to erect the flex of his film in front of the theatre. Their main expense is paying electricity bill, which is insignificant compared to them production of a film. They also have to pay the salaries for their employees. 
Suresh Kumar added 

He criticises the federation for asking big shares. When the total expense of building a theatre is just 7 crores, the average making of a movie will be higher and the there would only be a handful of movies that would have completed 50 days of running, yielding a profit for the movie makers, making it evident that most of the producers who come up with the plan of movie making are not financially safe after a movie release. But on the other hand, exhibitors do no seem to have any loss.

According to Kumar, the exhibitors seem to get more profit when a movie is held for long in the shelves.

Jibu Jacob, director of Mohanlal starring Munthirivallikal Thalirkkumbol hopes the issues will be resolved and he would be able to release his movie on 22 December, as planned.

“We were planning to release the film on 22 December. I really hope it gets settled,” he says.  

Jibu says he is as tensed as a father waiting outside the labour room.

My film is all set for release and my tension is running high. If the release gets delayed, I have to stay in this state till it reaches the screen
Jibu Jacob

At a function in Ernakulam, actor Prithviraj who is awaiting the release of his latest horror thriller, Ezra commented on the issue saying, “2016 was a golden period for Malayalam cinema nd 2017 looks to be more promising. Instead of creating roadblocks, i would be healthier if everybody would cooperate for the betterment of cinema.”

It is also rumoured that there will be a meeting between AK Balan, Cultural Minister and the official bearers of the Kerala Film Producers Association and the Kerala Film Exhibitors Federation to solve the ongoing conflict between the two on 20 December at Palakkad. If the feud meets final solution, then Malayalee movie lovers can watch their anticipated movies in December itself.