After decades is Tamil Nadu going to witness anti -Hindi protests? Dravidian parties vow to fight centre’s move to impose national language

April 1, 2017, 12:12 pm
 After decades is Tamil Nadu going to witness anti -Hindi protests? Dravidian parties vow to fight centre’s move to impose national language
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 After decades is Tamil Nadu going to witness anti -Hindi protests? Dravidian parties vow to fight centre’s move to impose national language

After decades is Tamil Nadu going to witness anti -Hindi protests? Dravidian parties vow to fight centre’s move to impose national language

After decades, Tamil Nadu seems to be inching towards an anti Hindi protests if the statements of the Dravidian parties are an indication. The sudden trigger against Hindi came when the National Highway Authority quietly changed Englih signage from the National Highway and replaced it with Hindi boards.

In many districts the National Highway Authority had replaced the English signboards with Hindi. This according to Dravidian parties is against the three language policy

Dravida Munnetra Kazhagham (DMK) acting president M.K. Stalin has dared to start an anti-Hindi movement in Tamil Nadu if the BJP government at the centre prioritise Hindi and give less importance to Tamil language. He was responding to the recent replacement of signboards with English language with those of Hindi along the National Highways in Tamil Nadu.

Stalin accused the BJP-led Central Government of imposing Hindi language through the backdoor in the state.

We strongly condemn the act of replacing English language with that of Hindi along the National highways.If the BJP government tries to prioritise Hindi and give less importance to Tamil language then a new movement against Hindi could start.
MK Stalin

MDMK chief Vaiko has warned the government against committing the mistakes of the past. He was quoted by The Hindu as saying that centre government has promised Tamil Nadu that it will not impose Hindi

Earlier in the 1930s and 1960s, Tamil Nadu saw massive protests and riots against ‘Hindi imposition’.

In 1937, stiff resistance emerged to the introduction of compulsory teaching of Hindi in the schools of the then Madras Presidency by the first Indian National Congress government led by C. Rajagopalachari.

This move was immediately opposed by E. V. Ramasamy, popularly known as Periyar, and the opposition the Justice Party, which was later renamed as Dravidar Kazhagam.

DMK, which split off from the Dravidar Kazhagam, later led the opposition to Hindi in 1965.