Russians finally say goodbye to Lenin? As majority citizens want him buried, lawmakers introduce bill

April 21, 2017, 4:07 pm
Russians finally say goodbye to Lenin? As majority citizens want him buried, lawmakers introduce bill
WORLD
WORLD
Russians finally say goodbye to Lenin? As majority citizens want him buried, lawmakers introduce bill

Russians finally say goodbye to Lenin? As majority citizens want him buried, lawmakers introduce bill

After a recent survey found that nearly 58 percent of Russians think the communist revolutionary Lenin’s body should be taken from the Red Square Mausoleum and properly buried, a legislation designed to turf him out was introduced in the Russian parliament.

However, the communist party, which was in power until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, called any such move “a provocation” that could lead to mass unrest if pursued. But the lawmakers from the ruling United Russia party and two from a pro-Kremlin nationalist party relied on the poll to introduce the draft.

Though majority of the Russians wanted the Bolshevik leader to be buried, they don’t want the monument to be removed from Moscow’s main square.

Previous attempts to remove it have foundered amid warnings it would split society. The legislation introduced on Thursday would enforce no immediate action but remove legal impediments to it being reburied when authorities judged the time right, Reuters reported.

“We are not suggesting that a historical analysis of the events associated with the burial of Lenin be conducted or trying to argue for the necessity of reburying the remains because of an assessment of his role in state history,” the lawmakers wrote in a note explaining the legislation.

According to Russia Today, 32 percent of those who agreed the body of the communist revolutionary leader should be moved from Red Square want to bury him near the Kremlin walls.

Lenin’s body was originally laid out in a wooden mausoleum but this was later replaced by a granite structure, the seat of a powerful cult of personality from which generations of Soviet leaders presided over parades. The corpse, laid out in three-piece suit, is still viewed by the faithful and by curious tourists, but queues are now shorter than Soviet times.

Incidentally, 26 percent of the respondents said that Lenin will live on in people’s memory but no one will follow in his path while another 23 percent said that Lenin led the country to progress and equality. 21 percent answered that his ideas were distorted by his followers.