‘Impeachment talk’ gains momentum in US as Republicans too feel Trump is not non impeachable

May 18, 2017, 3:02 pm
‘Impeachment talk’ gains momentum in US as Republicans too feel Trump is not non impeachable
WORLD
WORLD
‘Impeachment talk’ gains momentum in US as Republicans too feel Trump is not non impeachable

‘Impeachment talk’ gains momentum in US as Republicans too feel Trump is not non impeachable

The chorus for impeachment of the US President Donald Trump is gaining momentum after his recent decision to fire FBI chief who was investigating Russian link to his election to the White House.

With The US Department of Justice on Thursday naming a former FBI head Robert Mueller as a special counsel to lead an investigation into alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and possible collusion with the Republican team, Trump’s life in the White House is getting a whole lot harder, according to various reports coming from Washington.

Following the new developments, for the first time, a survey from Public Policy Polling found 48 percent support impeaching the president, while just 41 percent would oppose the move. And notably, even Republicans too have apparently begun to grapple with the prospect that Donald Trump could be impeached. Though a number of congressional Democrats have proposed impeaching Trump already, no Republicans have echoed those calls, but they feels that their president is no more non-impeachable.

Donald Trump with Russian officials. 
Donald Trump with Russian officials. 

The US representative from Texas, Al Green, on Wednesday has called for impeaching President Donald Trump from the House floor.

“I rise today, Mr. Speaker, to call for the impeachment of the president of the United States of America for obstruction of justice,” Green said.

“I do not do this for political purposes. I do it because, Mr. Speaker, there is a belief in this country that no one is above the law. And that includes the president of the United States of America. Mr. Speaker, our democracy is at risk,” he continued.

By allegedly trying to interfere the federal investigation, Trump has committed similar offense that forced former president Richard Nixon to resign over the Watergate crisis.

The announcement that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has appointed Robert Mueller III, the former FBI director, to serve as special counsel overseeing the Russian probe only strengthens the spreading sense that Trump is finished, a Massachusetts-based Professor Lawrence Douglas explains.

The same sense echoes from the republican sect too. A Republican congressman Justin Amash told The Hill that if reports about Trump’s pressure on Comey to drop the prob were true, it would merit his impeachment.

Another Republican representative Carlos Curbelo, while speaking to CNN, compared Trump allegedly pressuring Comey to drop the Flynn inquiry, to the obstruction of justice cases that led to impeachment proceedings for former presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton.

“Obstruction of justice in the case of Nixon, in the case of Clinton in the late 90s, has been considered an impeachable offence,” Curbelo quoted saying.

James Comey (L)and Robet Muller (R)
James Comey (L)and Robet Muller (R)

Reports of contact between Trump’s national security adviser Michael Flynn and Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak has been on air since January, even before Trump’s inauguration. The officials repeatedly stated that the conversations between Kislyak and Flynn did not address the US sanctions against Russia. In February, Flynn retracted his earlier denials and said he was unsure whether he discussed the sanctions during his conversations with Kislyak. He resigned days later.

Subsequently, Comey had announced that the FBI was investigating whether members of Trump’s campaign had colluded with Russia. Flynn said later that month he was willing to testify in front of the House and Senate intelligence committees carrying out their own investigations in exchange for immunity.

According to the recent New York Times expose, Comey wrote in a memo that Trump told him: “I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go.”

As long as the memo exists, though the white House maintains that it is not an accurate portrayal of the conversation between Trump and Comey, the argument that Trump had attempted to influence investigations into his associates and Russia is not going to die down, rather would create new political waves, which would be fatal enough through the president out of the Oval Office.

Even the announced probe into the Trump-Russia links is apparently a result of pressure mounted in Congress, which is expected to grow further.

However, trump has been consistently rejecting any collusion between his camp and Moscow, and has been terming the reports as “fake news”. On Wednesday, he accused the media of creating the trouble, adding that he had been treated “more unfairly” than any US leader in history during his fledgling presidency.

Notably, his Twitter feed, which has been a much-used mode of reply to ‘negative news’ coverage, remains quite quiet.

The Texas Democrat green rattled off a website, impeachdonaldtrumpnow.org, and urged people to sign a petition saying it’s time to begin impeachment proceedings.