Objected to use word ‘Rohingya’ in reports, BBC ends broadcasting deal with Myanmar TV as state-sponsored massacres continue  

September 4, 2017, 6:56 pm
Objected to use word ‘Rohingya’ in reports, BBC ends broadcasting deal with Myanmar TV as state-sponsored massacres continue  
WORLD
WORLD
Objected to use word ‘Rohingya’ in reports, BBC ends broadcasting deal with Myanmar TV as state-sponsored massacres continue  

Objected to use word ‘Rohingya’ in reports, BBC ends broadcasting deal with Myanmar TV as state-sponsored massacres continue  

The BBC's Burmese language service on Monday pulled a broadcasting deal with a popular Myanmar television channel after the latter reportedly objected to using the word "Rohingya" in reports.

Myanmar's government and most local media call Rohingya Muslims Bengalis, to portray them as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh despite many living in the country for generations.

The decision was taken at a time thousands of Rohingyas are being prosecuted in country's western Rakhine.

The BBC's Burmese language service said it is ending the deal due to "censorship".

The announcement is seen as a major blow to freedom of the press in Myanmar, where almost all media refuse to cover the state-sponsored genocide of Rohingya Muslims.

Since April 2014, BBC Burmese broadcast a daily news programme on MNTV with 3.7 million daily viewers.

"The BBC cannot accept interference or censorship of BBC programs by joint-venture TV broadcasters as that violates the trust between the BBC and its audience," a report the BBC's Burmese website said.

The BBC statement did not detail what content was censored and MNTV did not respond to requests for comment.

As the deadly violence against Rohingya Muslims continues, at least 87,000 migrants from the country have arrived in Bangladesh last week.

A UN official said that 81,000 migrants were currently lodged in makeshift shelters and the remaining 6,000 settled with relatives in the permanent refugee camps in Cox's Bazar district.

The official also said that many of them reached the neighbouring country with gunshot wounds and grave injuries.

Reports of massacres and the systematic torching of villages by security forces -- as well as by militants -- have further amplified tensions, raising fears that communal violence in Rakhine is spinning out of control.