Fluid-filled artificial womb developed by US scientists to help premature babies, successfully grew a lamb for four weeks 

April 26, 2017, 7:47 pm
Fluid-filled artificial womb developed by US scientists to help premature babies, successfully grew a lamb for four weeks 
YOUR HEALTH
YOUR HEALTH
Fluid-filled artificial womb developed by US scientists to help premature babies, successfully grew a lamb for four weeks 

Fluid-filled artificial womb developed by US scientists to help premature babies, successfully grew a lamb for four weeks 

Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, US created an artificial womb which has grown eight fetal lambs for over four weeks.

Surgeons and neonatologists at the hospital, who led the path breaking research, said that the artificial womb would help extremely premature babies avoid death or life-long disability.

Researchers claimed that they were able to support the fetuses for up to 28 days without any damage to the their internal organs like lungs and brain.

"It is designed to continue what naturally occurs in the womb," Alan Flake, a foetal surgeon at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia said.

The senior author of a study in Nature Communications also said that they will improve on what is currently done for premature babies.

That’s the beauty of it, and why I’m optimistic we will improve on what is currently done for extremely premature babies
Alan Flake, foetal surgeon

Flake added that this system is potentially far superior to what hospitals can currently do for a 23-week-old baby born at the cusp of viability.

"This could establish a new standard of care for this subset of extremely premature infants", he said.

According to reports, the group has spent three years developng the system into what was finally acquired.

An investigator with the hospital's Centre for Fetal Research and the project's Marcus Davey said that one of the major advantages of the system is the avoidance of heart failure, which comes from the imbalance of blood flows created with pump circuits.

A professor of reproductive medicine at the University of Edinburgh Colin Duncan said: "This is a really attractive concept and this study is a very important step forward."

He added that the devices will require a lot of additional preclinical research and development.