Low-fat milk drinker? Parkinson’s disease may not be too far  

June 9, 2017, 12:02 pm
Low-fat milk drinker? Parkinson’s disease may not be too far  
YOUR HEALTH
YOUR HEALTH
Low-fat milk drinker? Parkinson’s disease may not be too far  

Low-fat milk drinker? Parkinson’s disease may not be too far  

Though low-fat dairy products are seen as an alternative for full-fat milk for a healthier lifestyle by nutritionists and doctors, latest study prove that consuming higher amounts of low-fat dairy may raise the risk of Parkinson's disease.

The risk seemed to be higher in adults consuming more than three servings of low fat products per day compared to those taking only one. The risk of Parkinson's could be linked specifically to milk intake; subjects who consumed at least one serving of skim milk or low-fat milk every day had a 39 percent increased risk of Parkinson's, compared with those who drank less than one serving per week.

The findings were reported in the journal Neurology by study co-author Katherine C. Hughes, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, MA, and colleagues.

Compared with participants who consumed less than one serving of dairy every day, subjects who consumed at least three servings daily were found have a 34 percent greater risk of developing Parkinson's disease.

Parkinson's disease is a neurological disorder characterized by tremors, problems with movement, impaired balance or coordination, and muscle rigidity.

According to the Parkinson's Disease Foundation, up to 1 million people in the United States are living with Parkinson's disease, and around 60,000 U.S. adults are diagnosed with the condition annually.

Previous studies have suggested that there may be a link between the consumption of dairy products, particularly milk, and increased risk of Parkinson's disease.

The investigation involved an analysis of around 25 years worth of data from more than 120,000 men and women.

Consumption of sherbet and frozen yogurt was also associated with a modest increased risk of Parkinson's disease, the researchers report.

However, the researchers point out that their study is purely observational, so it is unable to prove cause and effect.